tag archives: lytro

absam forest fire: three weeks later [photos]

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in mid-march, the hochmahdkopf forest fire claimed a total of 120 hectares of protective forest and turned into the biggest forest fire in tyrol’s history. restauration measures are expected to take about 15 years.
about three weeks after the fire, i did a short hike to check out the latschenegg site, and it looked like nature was beginning to reclaim the charred area:

absam forest fire: charred landscape at latschenegg absam forest fire: charred landscape at latscheneggabsam forest fire: fresh grass is sprouting at latschenegg

below are two interactive lytro pictures that capture the story:


(lytro living picture: click to refocus, click&drag for perspective shift)
(view on lytro.com

[more...]

[categories: living pictures, nature] [tags: , ]

living picture: tyrolean snack in the mountains [lytro]

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lard with onions, and a view.
an artery-clogger, but wonderfully delicious.


(lytro living picture: click to refocus, click&drag for perspective shift)
(view on lytro.com

taken and enjoyed a few weekends ago at walderalm in gnadenwald, austria.

[category: living pictures] [tags: , , ]

photo: spider wasp in action – when the hunter becomes the prey

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spider wasps (pompilidae) are – in a nutshell – really badass insects.
to provide food for their larvae, these wasps go hunting for spiders that are usually bigger than themselves. spiders are paralysed, placed in a small burrow or tunnel, and used as fresh food for a single egg/larva that is laid into them just before the nest is closed.

a spider wasp (pompilidae) carrying its paralysed spider prey

carrying something around that’s heavier than yourself is obviously quite a bit of work. here’s a short image sequence which shows how the wasp hauls its prey across the ground: [more...]

the things we do to our feet [lytro]

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what fascinates me most about rock climbing, is that i learned to use parts of my body for the activities they weren’t originally made for (or were made for, depending on how far you look back). for example, squeeze two neighbouring fingers into a small crack in the middle of a rock face, twist your hand slightly, and see how these two fingers can support your entire body’s weight without problems! (disclaimer: try at your own risk!)

here are some lytro living pictures from a recent visit to tivoli kletterzentrum, innsbruck.
as always, click to refocus, click&drag to shift perspective.


(lytro living picture: click to refocus, click&drag for perspective shift)
(view on lytro.com

[more...]

[category: living pictures] [tags: , , ]

living picture: garden cress

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spring is here (no matter the weather), and the first batch of garden cress is ready for a sandwich:


(lytro living picture: click to refocus, click&drag for perspective shift)
(view on lytro.com

(lytro living picture: click to refocus, click&drag for perspective shift)
[category: living pictures] [tags: ]

breakfast on the beach [lytro]

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a beautiful bay, some of the whitest beach in the world, refreshing calm seas, and weet-bix (cereal) in a bowl with milk – what more do you need for a great start into the day?
maybe a friendly local on his way to a swim who chats you up and gives you some travel advice. check!


(lytro living picture: click to refocus, click&drag for perspective shift)
(view on lytro.com

living picture taken at callalla beach, jervis bay, australia.

[categories: living pictures, travel] [tags: , ]

australia flashback: short-beaked echidna

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short-beaked echidna (tachyglossus aculeatus)

this short-beaked echidna (tachyglossus aculeatus) crossed our way near 90-mile beach. it kept going back and forth across the road at the blindest bend in kilometres. while generally afraid of me, it apparently felt very interested in my camera(s) and kept chasing my lens – a tremendous help when trying to lure it off street.

echidnas, or spiny ant-eaters, are peculiar little mammals that lay a single egg directly into their pouch. [more...]